In the largely untouched landscape of Alaska, people go missing at an eerily high rate with more missing people per capita than any other state. It's a place where people can vanish into the wilderness without a trace - with some disappearing because they want to, but many others missing because someone else wanted them to. Alaska Homicide sets out to find answers behind puzzling real-life cases. Lantz Dahlke became an Alaska State Trooper because he wanted to represent the best of the best. He eventually joined the Alaska Bureau of Investigation's Cold Case Unit to help bring justice to the many missing or murdered victims and their families. However, after only 18 months on the job, the unit was disbanded - leaving most of these cases unsolved. Even though the unit is done, Dahlke is not. He's more determined than ever to keep searching - despite the many roadblocks and potential dangers of not only nature but mankind.

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: In Development

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: None

Alaska Homicide - List of countries by intentional homicide rate - Netflix

List of countries by intentional homicide rate per year per 100,000 inhabitants. The reliability of underlying national murder rate data may vary. UNODC data is used in the main table below. In some cases it is not as up to date as other sources. See farther down as to why its data is used over other sources. Intentional homicide demographics are affected by changes in trauma care, leading to changed lethality of violent assaults, so the intentional homicide rate may not necessarily indicate the overall level of societal violence. They may also be under-reported for political reasons. A study undertaken by the Geneva Declaration on Armed Violence and Development estimated that there were approximately 490,000 intentional homicides in 2004. The study estimated that the global rate was 7.6 intentional homicides per 100,000 inhabitants for 2004. UNODC (United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime) reported a global average intentional homicide rate of 6.2 per 100,000 population for 2012 (in their report titled “Global Study on Homicide 2013”). UNODC calculated a rate of 6.9 in 2010.

Alaska Homicide - Definition - Netflix

Though some discrepancies exist in how specific categories of intentional killings are classified, the definitions used by countries to record data are generally close to the UNODC definition, making the homicide rates highly comparable at the international level. UNODC uses the homicide rate as a proxy for overall violence, as this type of crime is one of the most accurately reported and internationally comparable indicators. Figures from the Global Study on Homicide are based on the UNODC Homicide Statistics dataset, which is derived from the criminal justice or public health systems of a variety of countries and territories. The homicide rates derived from criminal justice data (typically recorded by police authorities) and the public health system data (recorded when the cause of death is established) may diverge substantially for some countries. The two sources usually match in the Americas, Europe and Oceania, but there are large discrepancies for the three African countries reporting both sources. For the 70 countries in which neither source was made available, figures were derived from WHO statistical models. Deaths resulting from an armed conflict between states are never included in the count. Killings caused by a non-international armed conflict may or may not be included, depending on the intensity of hostilities and whether it is classified as 'civil unrest' or a clash between organized armed groups.

This is how intentional homicide is defined by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) in its Global Study on Homicide report:

Within the broad range of violent deaths, the core element of intentional homicide is the complete liability of the direct perpetrator, which thus excludes killings directly related to war or conflicts, self-inflicted death (suicide), killings due to legal interventions or justifiable killings (such as self-defence), and those deaths caused when the perpetrator was reckless or negligent but did not intend to take a human life (non-intentional homicide).

Alaska Homicide - References - Netflix