With rare access to the notoriously private Amish community, this series follows five Amish teenagers traveling to Britain on an extraordinary cultural exchange.

Amish: World's Squarest Teenagers - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2010-07-25

Amish: World's Squarest Teenagers - Rumspringa - Netflix

Rumspringa (Pennsylvania German pronunciation: [rʊmˈʃprɪŋə]), also spelled Rumschpringe or Rumshpringa, is a rite of passage during adolescence, translated in English as “jumping/hopping around”, used in some Amish and Mennonite communities. The Amish, a subsect of the Anabaptist Christian movement, intentionally segregate themselves from other communities as a part of their faith. For Amish youth, the Rumspringa normally begins around the age of 14 to 16 and ends when a youth chooses baptism within the Amish church, or instead leaves the community. For Wenger Mennonites, Rumspringa occurs between ages 16 and 21. The majority choose baptism and remain in the church. Not all Amish use this term (it does not occur in John A. Hostetler's extended discussion of adolescence among the Amish), but in sects that do, Amish elders generally view it as a time for courtship and finding a spouse. A popular view exists by which the period is institutionalized as a rite of passage, and the usual behavioral restrictions are relaxed, so that Amish youth can acquire some experience and knowledge of the non-Amish world.

Amish: World's Squarest Teenagers - Popularized view - Netflix

Amish adolescents may engage in rebellious behavior, resisting or defying parental norms. In many cultures, enforcement may be relaxed, and misbehavior tolerated or overlooked to a degree. A view of rumspringa has emerged in popular culture that this divergence from custom is an accepted part of adolescence or a rite of passage for Amish youth. Among the Amish, however, rumspringa simply refers to adolescence. During that time a certain amount of misbehavior is unsurprising and is not severely condemned (for instance, by Meidung or shunning). Adults who have made a permanent and public commitment to the faith would be held to the higher standards of behavior defined in part by the Schleitheim and Dordrecht confessions. In a narrow sense the young are not bound by the Ordnung because they have not taken adult membership in the church. Amish adolescents do remain, however, under the strict authority of parents who are bound to Ordnung, and there is no period when adolescents are formally released from these rules. It is the period when the young person is regarded as having reached maturity, and is permitted to attend the Sunday night “singings” that are the focus of courtship among the Amish; according to Amish sources, a youth who dares to attend one of these events before the age of 16 might be force-fed warm milk from a spoon, as a good-natured reminder to observe the lines of status. Members of the local church district often attend the singings and usually bring younger children along. A minority of Amish youth do diverge from established customs. Some may be found: Wearing non-traditional clothing and hair styles (referred to as “dressing English”) Driving vehicles other than horse-drawn vehicles (for communities that eschew motor vehicles) Not attending home prayer Drinking and using other recreational drugs Not all youth diverge from custom during this period; approximately half in the larger communities and the majority in smaller Amish communities remain within the norms of Amish dress or behavior during adolescence. Almost 90 percent of Amish teenagers choose to be baptized and join the Amish church.

Amish: World's Squarest Teenagers - References - Netflix