A brutal scourge stalks the land. Yoma, monsters driven by a hunger satisfied by only one quarry – Humanity. The dark breed knows but a singular foe: Claymore. Human-Yoma hybrids of extraordinary strength and cunning, the Claymores roam from skirmish to skirmish delivering salvation by the edge of a blade.Thus begins the twisting tale of Clare, one such sister of the sword driven by pain in both victory and defeat. A child silent and suffering hidden in her past, Clare's march toward vengeance unfolds along a path marked by violence, solitude and scorn. In a land where even the predator is prey, the haunted hearts of hunter and hunted alike wear the scars of the age.

Claymore - Netflix

Type: Animation

Languages: Japanese

Status: Ended

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 2007-04-04

Claymore - Claymore - Netflix

A claymore (; from Scottish Gaelic: claidheamh-mòr, “great sword”) is either the Scottish variant of the late medieval two-handed sword or the Scottish variant of the basket-hilted sword. The former is characterised as having a cross hilt of forward-sloping quillons with quatrefoil terminations and was in use from the 15th to 17th centuries. The word claymore was first used in reference to swords in the 18th century in Scotland and parts of England to refer to basket-hilted swords. This description was maybe not used during the 17th century, when basket-hilted swords were the primary military swords across Europe, but these broad-bladed swords remained in service with Scottish regiments for some time longer. After the Acts of Union in 1707 when Scottish and English regiments were integrated together, the swords were seen as a mark of distinction by Scottish officers over the more slender sabres used by their English contemporaries: a symbol of physical strength and prowess, and a link to the historic Highland way of life. Such swords remained in service with Scottish regiments into the 19th century.

Claymore - Terminology - Netflix

The term claymore is an anglicisation of the Gaelic claidheamh-mór “great sword”, attested in 1772 (as Cly-more) with the gloss “great two-handed sword”. The sense “basket-hilted sword” is contemporaneous, attested in 1773 as “the broad-sword now used… called the Claymore, (i.e., the great sword)”, although OED observes that this usage is “inexact, but very common”. The 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica likewise judged that the term is “wrongly” applied to the basket-hilted sword. Countering this view, Paul Wagner and Christopher Thompson argue that the term “claymore” was applied first to the basket-hilted broadsword, and then to all Scottish swords. They provide quotations that are earlier than those given above in support of its use to refer to a basket-hilted broadsword and targe: “a strong handsome target, with a sharp pointed steel, of above half an ell in length, screw'd into the navel of it, on his left arm, a sturdy claymore by his side” (1715 pamphlet). They also note its use as a battle-cry as early as 1678. Some authors suggest that claybeg should be used instead, from a purported Gaelic claidheamh-beag “small sword”. This does not parallel Scottish Gaelic usage. According to the Gaelic Dictionary by R. A. Armstrong (1825), claidheamh-mòr translates to “broadsword”, and claidheamh dà làimh to “two-handed sword”, while claidheamh-beag is given as a translation of “Bilbo”.

Claymore - References - Netflix