Jason Alexander, of Seinfeld fame, narrates truTV's new comedy series Clipaholics. Each week, viewers are assaulted with the funniest, most outrageous video clips from around the world. You'll never know what's coming next as Clipaholics offers its own unique spin on stunts gone wrong, dumb criminal fails and countless embarrassing moments caught on tape.

Clipaholics - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2012-05-31

Clipaholics - Jason Alexander - Netflix

Jay Scott Greenspan (born September 23, 1959), known by his stage name Jason Alexander, is an American actor, voice actor, comedian, and director. Alexander is best known for his role as George Costanza in the television series Seinfeld. Other well-known roles include Phillip Stuckey in the film Pretty Woman (1990) and the title character in the animated series Duckman (1994–1997). Alexander has had an active career on stage, appearing in several Broadway musicals including Jerome Robbins' Broadway in 1989, for which he won the Tony Award as Best Leading Actor in a Musical. He appeared in the Los Angeles production of The Producers. He was the Artistic Director of “Reprise! Broadway's Best in Los Angeles”, where he has directed several musicals.

Clipaholics - Television - Netflix

Alexander is best known as one of the key cast members of the award-winning television sitcom Seinfeld (1989–1998), in which he played George Costanza (Seinfeld's character's best friend since childhood). Alexander was nominated for six (6) Primetime Emmy Awards and four (4) Golden Globe Awards for his performance as Costanza, but did not win any, mainly due to his co-star, Michael Richards being nominated and winning for his role as Cosmo Kramer. He did, however, win a Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Comedy Series for his work. Before Seinfeld, he starred in a commercial for John Deere and in a short-lived CBS sitcom called Everything's Relative in 1987 which lasted ten episodes. Concurrently with his Seinfeld role, Alexander provided the voice of the lead character in the cult animated series Duckman (1994–1997). Alexander voiced Catbert, the evil director of human resources, in the short-lived Dilbert animated series based on the popular comic strip. Alexander made cameo appearances in the second season of Curb Your Enthusiasm, playing himself and appeared in the seventh season of Curb Your Enthusiasm, along with the other three principal Seinfeld cast members. He had a part in the ABC sitcom Dinosaurs, as Al “Sexual” Harris (who frequently engaged in sexual harassment) as well as other voices. Despite a successful career in film and stage, Alexander never managed to repeat his Seinfeld-level of success in television. 2001 marked his first post-Seinfeld return to prime-time television: the heavily promoted but short-lived ABC sitcom Bob Patterson (which was canceled after five episodes). Alexander partially blames the lack of success on the mood of the country after 9/11. His second chance as a TV series lead, the CBS sitcom Listen Up! (September 20, 2004 to April 25, 2005), also fell short of a second season. Alexander was the principal executive producer of the series, based very loosely on the life of the popular sports-media personality Tony Kornheiser. Alexander appeared on the Family Guy: Live in Vegas CD and sang a verse in a song. He was featured in the Friends episode “The One Where Rosita Dies” as a suicidal supply manager named Earl. Phoebe calls him trying to sell him toner and she learns about his problem and tries to persuade him not to commit suicide. This is referred to in an episode of Malcolm in the Middle where Alexander appears as a neurotic and critical loner called Leonard. He describes himself as free and mentions that he makes money with a job “selling toner over the phone”. Later in the episode, he is repeatedly harassed by a man named George – his character's name on Seinfeld. Alexander appeared in the 1995 TV version of the Broadway musical Bye Bye Birdie, as Conrad Birdie's agent, Albert Peterson. He guest-starred in episode 8 of the 1996 variety show Muppets Tonight. Alexander appeared on Star Trek: Voyager on the episode “Think Tank” playing a genius alien named Kurros who was trying to get Seven of Nine to serve on his ship. He appeared in “One Night at Mercy”, the first episode of the short-lived 2002 revival of The Twilight Zone, playing Death. He featured in the 2005 Monk episode “Mr. Monk and the Other Detective” as Monk's rival, Marty Eels. On the June 26, 2006 episode of the Jimmy Kimmel Live! talk show, Alexander demonstrated several self-defense techniques. He was the Host of the 230th July 4, 2006 of the PBS July 4 “A Capitol Fourth” Celebrations in Washington, D.C. in which he sang, danced, and played tuned drums. In 2006, Alexander signed on to feature as a regular cast member in the second season of Everybody Hates Chris. Alexander was the host of the Comedy Central Roast of actor William Shatner on August 13, 2006 (first airdate: August 20, 2006). In 2007, Alexander was a guest star in the third episode of the improv comedy series Thank God You're Here. He is a frequent guest and panelist on: Bill Maher's Politically Incorrect and Real Time shows; Hollywood Squares; the Late Late Show, with both Craig Kilborn and Craig Ferguson; and the Late Show with David Letterman. In 2008, Alexander guest-starred on the CBS show Criminal Minds in the season four episode “Masterpiece” as Prof. Rothschild, a well-educated serial killer obsessed with the Fibonacci sequence who sends the team into a race against time to save his last victims. He returned in the same season to direct the episode “Conflicted”, featuring the actor Jackson Rathbone. In 2011, Alexander was the guest star in an episode of Harry's Law, playing a high school teacher bringing a wrongful dismissal suit.

Clipaholics - References - Netflix