Droopy: Master Detective - Netflix

Type: Animation

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 1993-09-11

Droopy: Master Detective - Droopy - Netflix

Droopy is an animated character from the Golden Age of American Animation: an anthropomorphic dog with a droopy face, hence the name Droopy. He was created in 1943 by Tex Avery for theatrical cartoon shorts produced by the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer cartoon studio. Essentially the polar opposite of Avery's other famous MGM character, the loud and wacky Screwy Squirrel, Droopy moves slowly and lethargically, speaks in a jowly monotone voice, and—though hardly an imposing character—is shrewd enough to outwit his enemies. When finally roused to anger, often by a bad guy laughing heartily at him, Droopy is capable of beating adversaries many times his size with a comical thrashing (“You know what? That makes me mad!”). The character first appeared, nameless, in Avery's 1943 cartoon Dumb-Hounded. Though he would not be called “Droopy” onscreen until his fifth cartoon, Señor Droopy (1949), the character was officially first labeled Happy Hound, a name used in the character's appearances in Our Gang Comics (the character was already christened the name “Droopy” in model sheets for his first cartoon). The Droopy series ended in 1958 as a result of MGM closing its cartoon department, but the character has been revived several times for new productions, often movies and television shows also featuring MGM's other famous cartoon stars, Tom and Jerry. In the cartoon Northwest Hounded Police, Droopy's last name was given as “McPoodle”. In The Chump Champ, it was given as “Poodle”. Nevertheless, Droopy is generally understood to be a basset hound.

Droopy: Master Detective - Later appearances - Netflix

In 1980, Filmation produced a series of lower-budget Droopy shorts for television as part of its Tom and Jerry TV series The Tom and Jerry Comedy Show. In the 1990s Hanna-Barbera series Tom & Jerry Kids, Droopy had a young son named Dripple (voiced by Charlie Adler), an older version of the infant we see in Homesteader Droopy. The mild success of the show provided perhaps the most Droopy merchandise: plush toys, gummy snacks, figurines, etc. In 1993, Tom & Jerry Kids had a spin-off series, Droopy, Master Detective, which cast Droopy and son as film noir style detectives. Droopy also had cameos in two theatrical features: as an elevator operator in Who Framed Roger Rabbit (where he was voiced by the film's animation director Richard Williams), and in Tom and Jerry: The Movie. Droopy also had cameos in all three subsequent Disney-produced Roger Rabbit shorts, Tummy Trouble (again he's an elevator operator), Roller Coaster Rabbit (he plays a bad guy dressed as Snidely Whiplash), and Trail Mix-Up (he plays a scuba diver). Droopy also appears in the 2006 cartoon series Tom and Jerry Tales and direct-to-video movies like Tom and Jerry: The Magic Ring. In the early 2000s, Droopy appeared in a Cartoon Network short entitled Thanks a Latté, in which he works at a coffee shop and forces a stingy wolf into giving him a tip. In said short, the character is depicted with a bald head. The short now airs on Cartoon Network's sister channel Boomerang. During the same period, Droopy was also featured in Adult Swim's Harvey Birdman, Attorney at Law in the episode “Droopy Botox” voiced by Maurice LaMarche. He is seen seeking a settlement after a cosmetic surgeon injected him with too much botox (a running gag in this episode was the fact that Droopy was often seen crying despite having a huge grin frozen on his face, whereas in the classic cartoons a sad-faced Droopy would often say, “You know what? I'm happy”). A memorable Cartoon Network promotional spot featured Droopy (voiced by Don Messick) and Shaggy from Scooby-Doo parodying a dialog scene between Jules and Vincent in Pulp Fiction. A three-issue Droopy comic book miniseries was released in the mid-1990s by Dark Horse Comics. In 1997, Droopy appeared in Cartoon Network's Bloopers Of The Cartoon Stars bumper. Here in his blooper reel he says his signature line “I'm so happy” while actually smiling.

Droopy: Master Detective - References - Netflix