Kitchen Stadium die-hards, we have breaking news for you. Just this afternoon, Alton Brown sent this tweet, and with only one word and a single hashtag — "Finally. #IronChefGauntlet" — he announced an upcoming series. Here's what we know: Beginning in the spring of the new year, an all-new reboot of the beloved Iron Chef America is set to roll out. The name of this reimagined competition is Iron Chef Gauntlet, and as Alton hinted with an accompanying photo, he's set to reprise his role as the host and master of ceremonies. Like both Iron Chef America and its big brother based in Japan, Iron Chef Gauntlet will celebrate the highest echelon of cooking. Look for some of your favorite elements of battle from Iron Chef America, plus new twists that will leave you craving more.

Iron Chef Gauntlet - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2017-04-16

Iron Chef Gauntlet - Iron Chef - Netflix

Iron Chef (料理の鉄人, Ryōri no Tetsujin, literally “Ironmen of Cooking”) is a Japanese television cooking show produced by Fuji Television. The series, which premiered on October 10, 1993, is a stylized cook-off featuring guest chefs challenging one of the show's resident “Iron Chefs” in a timed cooking battle built around a specific theme ingredient. The series ended on September 24, 1999, although occasional specials were produced until 2002. The series aired 309 episodes. Repeats are regularly aired on the Food Network in Canada, the Cooking Channel in the United States and on Special Broadcasting Service in Australia. Fuji TV aired a new version of the show, titled Iron Chef (アイアンシェフ, Aian Shefu), starting on October 26, 2012.

Iron Chef Gauntlet - Commentary and judging - Netflix

Throughout the cook-off, running commentary is made in a booth near the cooking area by an announcer, Kenji Fukui; a commentator, Yukio Hattori, and one or two of the guest judges, with one floor reporter (sometimes two; normally Shinichiro Ohta) providing details of the action on each side. The commentators and judges discuss the style of cooking, culinary traditions and unusual food preparation. At the end of the hour, after end-of-battle interviews with both competitors, each dish is presented to the camera, with a description of its properties (written by the show's screenwriters based on the chef's explanation) read by the announcer. Then, a panel of three (later expanded to four and, later still, five) judges, of which typically one is a professional critic, tastes the dishes and judges them based on taste, presentation, and originality. Each chef may be awarded up to 20 points by each judge, with ten given for taste and five each for presentation and originality. The chef with the greatest score wins the competition. (In earlier four-judge episodes, the win went to the chef who won three of the four judges, or, failing that, the chef that makes the highest points total.) Chairman Kaga tastes the dishes along with the judges. While he occasionally makes comments and seeks input from judges during tasting, he generally does not participate in scoring; he did, however, during the 2000th Dish Battle. During this episode, a team of French cuisine chefs—captain Hiroyuki Sakai, the original Iron Chef French Yutaka Ishinabe, and former challenger and Etsuo Joh—battled a team of Chinese cuisine chefs composed of captain Chen Kenichi, former challenger Sozo Myamoto, and former challenger Yuji Wakiya (who would later be Iron Chef Chinese on the 2012 revival). To break the tie, Chairman Kaga asked them to allow him this one instance of selfishness, and he cast his vote for the French team.

Iron Chef Gauntlet - References - Netflix