Laurel & Hardy in animated form were seen on TV in the fall of 1966. Larry Harmon did Stan Laurel's voice, and Jim MacGeorge did Oliver Hardy. 156 shorts were made in total, each having its own opening and closing wrap-arounds, to make them easy to air in syndication.

Laurel & Hardy - Netflix

Type: Animation

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 5 minutes

Premier: 1966-10-01

Laurel & Hardy - Music box - Netflix

A music box or musical box is an automatic musical instrument in a box that produces musical notes by using a set of pins placed on a revolving cylinder or disc to pluck the tuned teeth (or lamellae) of a steel comb. They were developed from musical snuff boxes of the 18th century and called carillons à musique (French for “chimes of music”). Some of the more complex boxes also contain a tiny drum and/or bells in addition to the metal comb.

Laurel & Hardy - Parts - Netflix

The bedplate is the relatively heavy metal foundation on which all the other pieces are fastened, usually by screws. The ratchet lever or the windup key is used to put the spring motor under tension, that is to wind it up. The spring motor or motors (two or more can be used to make playing times longer) give anywhere from a few minutes to an hour or more of playing time. The comb is a flat piece of metal with dozens or even hundreds of tuned teeth, or 'reeds', of different lengths. The cylinder is the programming object, a metallic version of a punched card which instead of having holes to express a program, is studded with tiny pins at the correct spacing to produce music by displacing the teeth of the comb at the correct time. The tines of the comb 'ring', or sound, as they slip off the pins. The disc in a disc music box plays this function, with pins perpendicular to the plane surface. Multiple-tune cylinders have more than one set of pins intertwined on the same cylinder, with, for example, the B pins for a second song lying halfway between the B and C pins of the first song, etc. Offsetting the cylinder slightly relative to the comb brings the different set of pins into contact with the teeth, thereby playing an alternate piece of music. Many modern music boxes will have as many as four sets of pins intertwined, with a mechanism automatically shifting the cylinder from one song or movement to the next.

Laurel & Hardy - References - Netflix