Laurel & Hardy in animated form were seen on TV in the fall of 1966. Larry Harmon did Stan Laurel's voice, and Jim MacGeorge did Oliver Hardy. 156 shorts were made in total, each having its own opening and closing wrap-arounds, to make them easy to air in syndication.

Laurel & Hardy - Netflix

Type: Animation

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 5 minutes

Premier: 1966-10-01

Laurel & Hardy - James Finlayson (actor) - Netflix

James Finlayson (27 August 1887 – 9 October 1953) was a Scottish-born American actor who worked in both silent and sound comedies. Bald, with a fake moustache, Finlayson had many trademark comic mannerisms and is famous for his squinting, outraged, “double take and fade away” head reaction, and characteristic expression “d'ooooooh”, and as the most famous comic foil of Laurel and Hardy.

Laurel & Hardy - Hal Roach Studios - Netflix

However, Finlayson is most remembered for his work at the Hal Roach Studios. In the mid-1920s, Roach attempted to make a top-billed star out of Finlayson, but the effort was unfocused and he never caught on. The next step came in 1927 when the All-Star Comedy series gave Finlayson equal billing with up-and-coming co-stars Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy, comedian Edna Marion, and others; some studio publicity even referred to Finlayson, Hardy and Laurel as a “famous comedy trio”. But Roach staff producer and future multi-Oscared director Leo McCarey recognized the great potential of a Laurel-and-Hardy pairing and began developing their characters and expanding their roles toward that end; by the autumn of 1928, Laurel and Hardy was a formal studio series with its own production prefixes while the All-Star Comedy series – and Finlayson's equal co-billing – were things of the past. Yet so memorable an antagonist was he to “The Boys” that even with his diminished billing, he was still “considered by many to be an indispensable part of the Laurel & Hardy team.” Altogether, Finlayson played roles in 33 Laurel and Hardy films, usually as a villain or an antagonist, notably in the celebrated films Big Business (1929) and Way Out West (1937). He also starred alongside Stan Laurel in 19 films and opposite Oliver Hardy in five films before Laurel and Hardy were teamed together. He appeared in dozens of Roach Studio films, with Charley Chase, Glenn Tryon, Snub Pollard, and Ben Turpin. He was also in several Our Gang shorts, notably Mush and Milk, in which he and Spanky McFarland match wits in a comically adversarial phone conversation.

Laurel & Hardy - References - Netflix