The year is 1829: Jason Firbeck, a retired naval lieutenant recently widowed, takes sons Samuel and Luke and daughter Jassy to New South Wales to claim land bequeathed to them by a wealthy friend. A strange new world greets the Yorkshire family. Amid red-coated soldiery, yellow-jacketed convicts, and a tanned peasantry governed by a wealthy elite, the Firbecks equip themselves with arms and supplies, and set off across the sweltering plains; the hardships and hazards they face confirm Lukes resolve to become the leader of his family of pioneers.

Luke's Kingdom - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 1976-03-31

Luke's Kingdom - Gospel of Luke - Netflix

The Gospel According to Luke (Greek: Τὸ κατὰ Λουκᾶν εὐαγγέλιον, to kata Loukan evangelion), also called the Gospel of Luke, or simply Luke, is the third of the four canonical Gospels. It tells of the origins, birth, ministry, atonement, death, resurrection, and ascension of Jesus Christ. Luke is the longest of the four gospels and the longest book in the New Testament; together with Acts of the Apostles it makes up a two-volume work from the same pen, called Luke–Acts. The cornerstone of Luke–Acts' theology is “salvation history”, the author's understanding that God's purpose is seen in the way he has acted, and will continue to act, in history. It divides the history of first century Christianity into three stages, with the gospel making up the first two of these – the arrival among men of Jesus the Messiah, from his birth to the beginning of his earthly mission in the meeting with John the Baptist followed by his earthly ministry, Passion, death and resurrection (concluding the gospel story per se). The gospel's sources are the Gospel of Mark (for the narrative of Christ's earthly life), the sayings collection called the Q source (for his teachings), and a collection of material called the L (for Luke) source, which is found only in this gospel. Luke–Acts does not name its author. According to Church tradition this was Luke the Evangelist, the companion of Paul, but while this view is still occasionally put forward the scholarly consensus emphasises the many contradictions between Acts and the authentic Pauline letters. The most probable date for its composition is around 80–110 AD, and there is evidence that it was still being revised well into the 2nd century.

Luke's Kingdom - Audience and authorial intent - Netflix

Luke was written to be read aloud to a group of Jesus-followers gathered in a house to share the Lord's supper. The author assumes an educated Greek-speaking audience, but directs his attention to specifically Christian concerns rather than to the Greco-Roman world at large. He begins his gospel with a preface addressed to “Theophilus”: the name means “Lover of God,” and could be an individual or simply any Christian. Here he informs Theophilus of his intention, which is to lead his reader to certainty through an orderly account “of the events that have been fulfilled among us.” He did not, however, intend to provide Theophilus with a historical justification of the Christian faith – “did it happen?” – but to encourage faith – “what happened, and what does it all mean?”

Luke's Kingdom - References - Netflix