"Making a Murderer" chronicles the story of Steven Avery, who spent 18 years in prison for rape and was freed after DNA linked another man to the crime. His release triggered major criminal justice reform legislation, and he filed a lawsuit that threatened to expose corruption in local law enforcement and award him millions of dollars. But in the midst of the civil case, he became the prime suspect in a murder, for which he was convicted and sentenced to life in prison. Making A Murderer examines allegations of police and prosecutorial misconduct, evidence tampering and witness coercion. The series looks at what went wrong in the first case and questions whether scientific advances and legislative reforms over the past three decades have gotten us any closer to delivering truth and justice in the system.

Making a Murderer - Netflix

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2015-12-18

Making a Murderer - Perfume: The Story of a Murderer (film) - Netflix

Perfume: The Story of a Murderer is a 2006 German period psychological crime thriller film directed by Tom Tykwer and starring Ben Whishaw, Alan Rickman, Rachel Hurd-Wood, and Dustin Hoffman. Tykwer, with Johnny Klimek and Reinhold Heil, also composed the music. The screenplay by Tykwer, Andrew Birkin, and Bernd Eichinger is based on Patrick Süskind's 1985 novel Perfume. Set in 18th century France, the film tells the story of Jean-Baptiste Grenouille (Whishaw), an olfactory genius, and his homicidal quest for the perfect scent. Producer Eichinger bought the film rights to Süskind's novel in 2000 and began writing the screenplay together with Birkin. Tykwer was selected as the director and joined the two in developing the screenplay in 2003. Principal photography began on July 12, 2005 and concluded on October 16, 2005; filming took place in Spain, Germany, and France. The film was made on a budget of €50 million (est. $60 million), making it one of the most expensive German films. Perfume was released on September 14, 2006 in Germany, December 26, 2006 in the United Kingdom, and December 27, 2006 in the United States. It grossed over $135 million worldwide, of which over $53 million was made in Germany. Critics' reviews of the film were mixed; the consensus was that the film had strong cinematography and acting but suffered from an uneven screenplay.

Making a Murderer - Plot differences from original novel - Netflix

“Grenouille let it go at that. He refrained from overpowering some whole, live person ... that sort of thing would have ... resulted in no new knowledge. He knew he was master of the techniques needed to rob a human of his or her scent, and knew it was unnecessary to prove this fact anew. Indeed, human odour was of no importance to him whatsoever. He could imitate human odour quite well enough with surrogates. What he coveted was the odour of certain human beings: that is, those rare humans who inspire love. Those were his victims.”

There is also no scene of a death in Laura’s household grounds, nor any party described in them, and after finding her Grenouille does not visit her again until his preparations are complete. Instead, the novel describes Grenouille as deciding to kill his second victim in much the same manner as the first - purely because of an overwhelming impulse to possess her scent. His other victims are also killed purely for the purpose of practicing human scent preservation and perhaps because of the youthful appearance they all share, somewhat reminiscent of Laura, rather than for their perfume-related qualities or to combine with hers. The final perfume he creates in the book is a combination of ingredients, none of which are described except that from Laura. Laura's father does not encounter Grenouille until the latter is imminently to be executed, and there is no torture scene described in the book in which he is present.

The film largely follows the novel, with a few exceptions. The character of Pellisier, the rival perfumer, never appears in the novel; he is only ever alluded to by Baldini and others. Grenouille himself, although speaking little in the film, speaks much less in the novel. The novel covers at length his solo life in the mountain, and in his cave, which is treated much more briefly in the film, and in the novel he becomes accustomed to living almost in a torpor with no other beings around. After leaving, in the novel he spends considerable time as the guest of Marquis de La Taillade-Espinasse, who wishes to use him to prove pseudoscientific theories about altitude and health; this is cut in the film which describes him travelling directly to Grasse. In Grasse, in the novel, he learns the arts of perfume extraction but there is no description by Baldini in Paris, of “12 notes” with a “13th note” to command the others, as in the film - in the novel his sole motive is to obtain the scent of a rare kind of person - the kind who inspires love.

  • In the novel, unlike the film, Grenouille's motivation for killing is purely a result of his desire to possess those rare scents capable of inspiring love towards their possessor.

Making a Murderer - References - Netflix