Murder Made Me Famous shares personal accounts from victims' family members, jurors, members of law enforcement and journalists involved with each case to disclose new information and give viewers an intimate perspective. Featured commentator for every episode is author and PEOPLE crime reporter, Steve Helling, who has covered several high-profile crime stories including the Natalee Holloway and Laci Peterson disappearances.

Murder Made Me Famous - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2015-08-15

Murder Made Me Famous - Making a Murderer - Netflix

Making a Murderer is an American documentary television series that premiered on Netflix on December 18, 2015. The ten-episode first season, written and directed by Laura Ricciardi and Moira Demos, explores the story of Steven Avery, a man from Manitowoc County, Wisconsin, who served 18 years in prison for the wrongful conviction of sexual assault and attempted murder of Penny Beerntsen, before being fully exonerated in 2003 by DNA evidence. He filed a suit against the county on this case. In 2005, Avery was arrested on charges of murdering Teresa Halbach, a local photographer, and was convicted in 2007. The series also covers the arrest, prosecution, and conviction of Avery's nephew, Brendan Dassey, who was also charged in the murder, largely based on his confession under interrogation. The series was filmed over the course of ten years, with the filmmakers moving back and forth from New York City to Wisconsin during filming. To promote the series, Netflix released the first episode concurrently on YouTube and on Netflix, which it had not done for any other original programming. In July 2016, Netflix announced that it was filming a second season, to explore the aftermath of Dassey's conviction and the numerous appeals that have taken place. As a production, the series was favorably compared to the HBO series The Jinx and the podcast Serial. Making a Murderer was widely viewed and it has generated considerable controversy, both in Manitowoc County, the setting of events, and nationwide. A petition in December 2015 to the White House to pardon Avery garnered more than 500,000 signatures. The White House's statement noted “the President cannot pardon a state criminal offense”. On August 12, 2016, Avery's nephew Brendan Dassey, who was also found guilty, had his conviction overturned by a federal judge on the grounds that he was unconstitutionally coerced by the police into confessing to the murder, and this was the only substantial evidence in his case. On November 14, 2016, Federal Judge William Duffin ordered Dassey's release from prison within 90 days, if Wisconsin prosecutors do not move forward with a retrial. On November 17, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit blocked Dassey's release while the appeal is being heard. A three-judge panel from the 7th Circuit affirmed the Judge Duffin decision to release Dassey and stated that Dassey should be freed unless the state chooses to retry him. In December 2017, a panel of seven judges of the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit ruled in favor of upholding the original conviction in a split vote of 4 to 3, ruling that police had properly obtained Dassey's confession. In June 2018, the U.S. Supreme Court rejected a motion to hear arguments to overturn the Appeals Court ruling reinstating Dassey's conviction.

Murder Made Me Famous - Private investigators - Netflix

Michael O'Kelly – investigator hired by Len Kachinsky

Murder Made Me Famous - References - Netflix