House flippers Jeff and Rachel Krause revamp outdated Craftsman and bungalow homes in Tacoma, WA.

Northwest Revival - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: None minutes

Premier: 2018-01-20

Northwest Revival - Celtic Revival - Netflix

The Celtic Revival (also referred to as the Celtic Twilight or Celtomania) was a variety of movements and trends in the 19th and 20th centuries that saw a renewed interest in aspects of Celtic culture. Artists and writers drew on the traditions of Gaelic literature, Welsh-language literature, and so-called 'Celtic art'—what historians call Insular art (the Early Medieval style of Ireland and Britain). Although the revival was complex and multifaceted, occurring across many fields and in various countries in Northwest Europe, its best known incarnation is probably the Irish Literary Revival. Here, Irish writers including William Butler Yeats, Lady Gregory, “AE” Russell, Edward Martyn and Edward Plunkett (Lord Dunsany) stimulated a new appreciation of traditional Irish literature and Irish poetry in the late 19th and early 20th century. In many, but not all, facets the revival came to represent a reaction to modernisation. This is particularly true in Ireland, where the relationship between the archaic and the modern was antagonistic, where history was fractured, and where, according to Terry Eagleton, “as a whole [the nation] had not leapt at a bound from tradition to modernity”. At times this romantic view of the past resulted in historically inaccurate portrayals, such as the promotion of noble savage stereotypes of the Irish people and Scottish Highlanders, as well as a racialized view that referred to the Irish, whether positively or negatively, as a separate race. Perhaps the most widespread and lasting contribution of the revival was the re-introduction of the High cross as the Celtic cross, which now forms a familiar part of monumental and funerary art over most of the Western world. Though, there has been criticism to the unified concept of Celtic culture.

Northwest Revival - Cumbria - Netflix

Cumbric was a variety of the Common Brittonic language spoken during the Early Middle Ages in the Hen Ogledd or “Old North” in what is now Northern England and southern Lowland Scotland. It was closely related to Old Welsh and the other Brittonic languages. Place name evidence suggests Cumbric may also have been spoken as far south as Pendle and the Yorkshire Dales. The prevailing view is that it became extinct in the 12th century, after the incorporation of the semi-independent Kingdom of Strathclyde. In the 2000s, a group of enthusiasts proposed a revival of the Cumbric language and launched a social networking site and a “revived Cumbric” guidebook to promote it, but with little success. Writing in Carn magazine, Colin Lewis noted that there was disagreement in the group about whether to base “revived Cumbric” on the very few surviving sources for the language or

Northwest Revival - References - Netflix