This provocative reality series takes an inside look at non-monogamous, committed relationships that involve more than two people. Lindsey and Anthony are married and live in a triad (three-way relationship) with their girlfriend, Vanessa. Husband and wife Michael and Kamala (who have a young son) are adjusting to having two of their lovers, fellow married couple Jen and Tahl, move in with them. This explicit look at modern-day polyamory follows characters grappling with the emotional and sexual drama of sharing their hearts, as well as their beds.

Polyamory: Married and Dating - Netflix

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 2012-07-12

Polyamory: Married and Dating - Polyamory - Netflix

Polyamory (from Greek πολύ poly, “many, several”, and Latin amor, “love”) is the ability or capacity to love more than one person at a time. Sometimes seen as the practice of, or desire for, intimate relationships with more than one partner, with the knowledge of all partners involved. It has been described as “consensual, ethical, and responsible non-monogamy”. People who identify as polyamorous reject the view that sexual and relational exclusivity are necessary for deep, committed, long-term loving relationships. Polyamory has come to be an umbrella term for various forms of non-monogamous, multi-partner relationships, or non-exclusive sexual or romantic relationships. Its usage reflects the choices and philosophies of the individuals involved, but with recurring themes or values, such as love, intimacy, honesty, integrity, equality, communication, and commitment.

Polyamory: Married and Dating - Philosophical aspects - Netflix

In 1929, Marriage and Morals, written by the philosopher, mathematician, and Nobel Prize winner Bertrand Russell, questioned the contemporary notions of morality regarding monogamy in sex and marriage; John Dewey spoke out against this treatment. In Echlin's article in The Guardian, six reasons for choosing polyamory are identified: a drive towards female independence and equality driven by feminism; disillusionment with monogamy; a yearning for community; honesty and realism in respect of relational nature of human beings; human nature; and individual non-matching of the traditional monogamous stereotype. Jim Fleckenstein, director of the Institute for 21st-Century Relationships, is quoted as stating that the polyamory movement has been driven not only by science fiction, but also by feminism: “Increased financial independence means that women can build relationships the way they want to.” The disillusionment with monogamy is said to be “because of widespread cheating and divorce”. The longing for community is associated with a felt need for the richness of “complex and deep relationships through extended networks” in response to the replacement and fragmentation of the extended family by nuclear families. “For many”, Echlin writes, “it is a hankering for community ... we have become increasingly alienated, partly because of the 20th century's replacement of the extended family with the nuclear family. As a result, many of us are striving to create complex and deep relationships through extended networks of multiple lovers and extended families ... Polys agree that some people are monogamous by nature. But some of us are not, and more and more are refusing to be shoehorned into monogamy.” Others speak of creating an “honest responsible and socially acceptable” version of non-monogamy – “since so many people are already non-monogamous, why not develop a non-monogamy that is honest, responsible and socially acceptable? ... It seems weird that having affairs is OK but being upfront about it is rocking the boat.” A sixth reason, a couple's response to a failure of monogamy, by reaching a consensus to accept the additional relationship, is identified by other authors.

Polyamory: Married and Dating - References - Netflix