Yesterday takes a trip back through time to examine the lives of some of the grandest and most notorious figures in British history.

In carefully-arranged poses, the Kings and Queens of history still look down upon us today and are powerful symbols of bygone ages. Their iconic images, captured in famous portraits and paintings, are part of the very fabric of national culture.

But what lay behind the pomp and ceremony, the crowns and the courts?

Each one possessed the same foibles, bad habits and weaknesses as the rest of us. Historian Tracy Borman investigates the hidden histories of our monarchs, examining the very colourful private lives of Charles II, Queen Victoria, Louis IV, George III and the Prince Regent and Henry VIII.

Private Lives of the Monarchs - Netflix

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: In Development

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2017-11-20

Private Lives of the Monarchs - George V - Netflix

George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions, and Emperor of India, from 6 May 1910 until his death in 1936. Born during the reign of his grandmother Queen Victoria, George was third in the line of succession behind his father, the Prince of Wales, and his own elder brother, Prince Albert Victor. From 1877 to 1891, George served in the Royal Navy, until the unexpected death of his elder brother in early 1892 put him directly in line for the throne. On the death of his grandmother in 1901, George's father became King-Emperor of the British Empire as Edward VII, and George was created Prince of Wales. He became king-emperor on his father's death in 1910. George V's reign saw the rise of socialism, communism, fascism, Irish republicanism, and the Indian independence movement, all of which radically changed the political landscape. The Parliament Act 1911 established the supremacy of the elected British House of Commons over the unelected House of Lords. As a result of the First World War (1914–1918), the empires of his first cousins Tsar Nicholas II of Russia and Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany fell, while the British Empire expanded to its greatest effective extent. In 1917, George became the first monarch of the House of Windsor, which he renamed from the House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha as a result of anti-German public sentiment. In 1924 he appointed the first Labour ministry and in 1931 the Statute of Westminster recognised the dominions of the Empire as separate, independent states within the Commonwealth of Nations. He had smoking-related health problems throughout much of his later reign and at his death was succeeded by his eldest son, Edward VIII.

Private Lives of the Monarchs - See also - Netflix

Household of King George V and Queen Mary Interwar Britain

Private Lives of the Monarchs - References - Netflix