On Sunday morning, as Ireland prepares for the week ahead, show anchors Ivan Yates and Anna Daly will ensure you're up to date with everything you need to know. From in depth Sunday newspaper analysis, to unrivalled sports reviews; the Sunday: AM team will inform and entertain live from 9am to 12 Midday. Joined on set by Laura Woods and Tommy Martin, Sunday: AM will feature a peek into some of Ireland's most desirable homes, food from top chefs, and unrivalled expert advice on a variety of subjects.

Sunday AM - Netflix

Type: Variety

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 180 minutes

Premier: 2015-08-30

Sunday AM - Andrew Marr - Netflix

Andrew William Stevenson Marr (born 31 July 1959) is a British political commentator and television presenter. Beginning his career as a political commentator, he subsequently edited The Independent newspaper (1996–98), and was political editor of BBC News (2000–05). He began hosting a political programme—Sunday AM, now called The Andrew Marr Show—on Sunday mornings on BBC One from September 2005. In 2002, Marr took over as host of BBC Radio 4's long-running Start the Week Monday morning discussion programme . In 2007, he presented a political history of post-war Britain on BBC Two, Andrew Marr's History of Modern Britain, followed by a prequel in 2009, Andrew Marr's The Making of Modern Britain, focusing on the period between 1901 and 1945. In 2010, he presented a series, Andrew Marr's Megacities (the title distinguishes it from another Megacities series), examining the life, development and challenges of some of the largest cities in the world. In early 2012 he presented The Diamond Queen, a three-part series about the reign of Queen Elizabeth II. In late September 2012, Marr began presenting Andrew Marr's History of the World, a new series examining the history of human civilisation. Following a stroke in January 2013, Marr was in hospital for two months. He returned to presenting The Andrew Marr Show on 1 September 2013.

Sunday AM - Newspaper career - Netflix

Marr joined The Scotsman as a trainee and junior business reporter in 1981. In 1984, he moved to London where he became a parliamentary correspondent for the newspaper, and then a political correspondent in 1986. Marr met the political journalist Anthony Bevins, who became his mentor and close friend. Bevins was responsible for Marr's first appointment at The Independent as a member of the newspaper's launch staff. Marr left shortly afterwards, and joined The Economist, where he contributed to the weekly “Bagehot” political column and ultimately became the magazine's political editor in 1988. Marr has remarked that his time at The Economist “changed me quite a lot” and “made me question a lot of my assumptions”. Marr returned to The Independent as the newspaper's political editor in 1992, and became its editor in 1996 during a particularly turbulent time at the paper. Faced with price cutting by the Murdoch-owned Times, sales had begun to decline, and Marr made two attempts to arrest the slide. He made use of bold 'poster-style' front pages, and then in 1996 radically re-designed the paper along a mainland European model, with Gill Sans headline fonts, and stories being grouped together by subject matter, rather than according to strict news value. This tinkering ultimately proved disastrous. With a limited advertising budget, the re-launch struggled for attention, then was mocked for reinterpreting its original marketing slogan 'It Is – Are You' to read 'It's changed – have you?'. At the beginning of 1998, Marr was sacked, according to one version of events, for having refused to reduce the newspaper's production staff to just five subeditors. According to Nick Cohen's account, the sacking was due to the intervention of Alastair Campbell, director of communications for Tony Blair. Campbell had demanded that David Montgomery, the paper's publisher, fire Marr over an article in which he had compared Blair with his predecessor John Major. This article had followed an earlier one by Blair published in The Sun, in which Blair had written: “On the day we remember the legend that St George slayed a dragon to protect England, some will argue that there is another dragon to be slayed: Europe.” Marr's response asserted that Blair had spoken in bad faith, opportunistically championing Europe to pro-EU audiences while criticising it to anti-EU ones; and that the phrase “some will argue” was Blair's disingenuous rhetorical ruse to distance himself from the xenophobic appeal that he himself was making. Three months later, Marr returned to The Independent. Tony O'Reilly had increased his stake in the paper and bought out owners, the Mirror Group. O'Reilly, who had a high regard for Marr, asked him to collaborate as co-editor with Rosie Boycott, in an arrangement whereby Marr would edit the comment pages, and Boycott would have overall control of the news pages. Many pundits predicted the arrangement would not last and two months later, Boycott left to replace Richard Addis as editor of the Daily Express. Marr was sole editor again, but only for one week. Simon Kelner, who had worked on the paper when it was first launched, accepted the editorship and asked Marr to stay on as a political columnist. Kelner was not Marr's “cup of tea”, Marr observed later, and he left the paper for the last time in May 1998. Marr was then a columnist for the Daily Express and The Observer. Marr presented a three-part television series shown on BBC Two from 31 January to 2 February 2000 after Newsnight. A state-of-the-nation reflection, The Day Britain Died (2000) also had an accompanying book. Among Marr's other publications is My Trade: A Short History of British Journalism (2004).

Sunday AM - References - Netflix