The Ark is a high-concept drama and a grounded, modern retelling of the Noah's Ark story from the Bible. It centers on an engineer who, after the death of his wife, has a vision to construct a ship capable of sustaining life in space. When the build happens to coincide with the coming end of the world, the engineer realizes there may be a larger story at play.

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: In Development

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: None

The Ark - Noah's Ark - Netflix

Noah's Ark (Hebrew: תיבת נח‎; Biblical Hebrew: Tevat Noaḥ) is the vessel in the Genesis flood narrative (Genesis chapters 6–9) by which God spares Noah, his family, and a remnant of all the world's animals from a world-engulfing flood. According to Genesis, God gave Noah instructions for building the ark. Seven days before the deluge, God told Noah to enter the ark with his household and the animals. The story goes on to describe the ark being afloat for 150 days and then coming to rest on the Mountains of Ararat and the subsequent receding of the waters. The story is repeated, with variations, in the Quran, where the ark appears as Safina Nūḥ (Arabic: سفينة نوح‎ “Noah's boat”). The Genesis flood myth is similar to numerous other flood myths from a variety of cultures. The earliest known written flood myth is the Sumerian flood myth found in the Epic of Ziusudra. Searches for Noah's Ark have been made from at least the time of Eusebius (c. 275–339 CE), and although the historicity of Noah's Ark contradicts the established modern scientific consensus, searches continue to the present day.

The Ark - Narrative - Netflix

The Hebrew word for the ark, teva, occurs twice in the Bible, in the flood narrative (Book of Genesis 6-9) and in the Book of Exodus, where it refers to the basket in which Jochebed places the infant Moses. (The word for the ark of the covenant is quite different.) In both cases teva has a connection with salvation from waters. Noah is warned of the coming flood and told to construct the ark. God spells out to Noah the dimensions of the vessel: 300 cubits in length, 50 cubits in width and 30 cubits in height (450 × 75 × 45 ft or 137 × 22.9 × 13.7 m). It had three internal divisions (which are not actually called “decks”, although presumably this is what is intended), a door in the side, and a tsohar, which may be either a roof or a skylight. It is made of “gopher” wood, a word which appears nowhere else in the Bible, and is divided into qinnim, a word which always refers to birds' nests elsewhere, leading some scholars, including Irving Finkel, to emend this to qanim (reeds), the material used for the boat of Atrahasis, the Babylonian flood-hero. Noah is instructed to take on board his wife, his three sons, and his sons' wives. He is also to take two of every living thing, and seven pairs of every clean creature and of every bird, together with sufficient food.

The Ark - References - Netflix