This two-part documentary series for ITV follows the officers tasked with policing buzzing Brighton. Narrated by Philip Glenister, The Brighton Police follows officers on raids, undertaking surveillance, taking statements from witnesses and gathering evidence to bring criminals to justice.

The Brighton Police - Netflix

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2017-08-17

The Brighton Police - Brighton Beach - Netflix

Brighton Beach is an oceanside neighborhood in the southern portion of the New York City borough of Brooklyn, along the Coney Island peninsula. According to the 2010 United States Census report, the Brighton Beach and Coney Island area, combined, had more than 110,000 residents. Brighton Beach is bounded by Coney Island proper at Ocean Parkway to the west, Manhattan Beach at Corbin Place to the east, Sheepshead Bay at the Belt Parkway to the north, and the Atlantic Ocean to the south along the beach and boardwalk. It is known for its high population of Russian-speaking immigrants, and as a summer destination for New York City residents due to its beaches along the Atlantic Ocean and its proximity to the amusement parks in Coney Island.

The Brighton Police - Early development - Netflix

Brighton Beach is included in an area from Sheepshead Bay to Sea Gate that was purchased from the Natives Americans in 1645 for a gun, a blanket and a kettle. Brighton Beach was located on sandy terrain, and before development in the 1860s, had mostly farms. The area was part of the “Middle Division” of the town of Gravesend, which was the sole English settlement out of the original six towns in Kings County. By the mid-18th century, thirty-nine lots in the division had been distributed to the descendants of English colonists. In 1868, William A. Engeman built a resort in the area. The resort was given the name “Brighton Beach” in 1878 by Henry C. Murphy and a group of businessmen, who chose the name as an allusion to the English seaside resort of Brighton. With the help of Gravesend’s surveyor William Stillwell, Engeman acquired all 39 lots for $20,000, a “bargain price.” This 460-by-210-foot (140 by 64 m) hotel, with rooms for up to 5,000 people nightly and meals for up to 20,000 people daily, was close to the then-rundown Coney Island area, so it was mostly the upper middle class that went to this hotel. The 400-foot (120 m), double-decker Brighton Beach Pavilion was also built nearby. “Hotel Brighton” (or Brighton Beach Hotel) was situated on the beach at what is now the foot of Coney Island Avenue, and was accessed by the Brooklyn, Flatbush, and Coney Island Railway (the present-day BMT Brighton Line), which opened on July 2, 1878. Adjacent to the hotel, Engeman built the Brighton Beach Race Course for thoroughbred horse racing. In December 1887, an extremely high tide washed over the area, creating a new, temporary connection between Sheepshead Bay and the ocean. Wrote the Brooklyn Daily Eagle: “Unless [Engeman] is very lucky the next races on the Brighton Beach track will be conducted by the white crested horses of Neptune.” After that extremely high tide, and a decade of beach erosion, the Brighton Beach Hotel, by then owned by the Railway, faced the possibility of being “undermined and carried away.” A plan termed “highly ingenious and novel” was initiated by the superintendent of the Railway, J.L. Morrow, and its Secretary, E.L. Langford, to elevate and move the building as a whole, 495 feet further inland. This was accomplished by lifting the estimated 5000 ton, 460 by 150 feet (140 m × 46 m) building, using 13 hydraulic jacks, after which 24 lines of railroad track – a mile and a half length in total – were laid under it, and 112 railroad “platform cars” (flat cars) pulled by six steam locomotives were used to pull the hotel away from the sea. This careful engineering (by B.C. Miller) made the move successful; it began on April 2, 1888, and continued for the next nine days, and was the largest building move of the 19th century. Anton Seidl and the Metropolitan Opera brought their popular interpretations of Wagner to the Brighton Beach Music Hall, where John Philip Sousa was in residence, and the New Brighton Theater was a hotspot for vaudeville. Visitors for tea at Reisenweber’s Brighton Beach Casino would be served by Japanese waitresses in full costume. At an enormous private club, the Brighton Beach Baths, members could swim, access a private beach, and play handball, mah-jongg, and cards. The village, along with the rest of Gravesend, was annexed into the 31st Ward of the City of Brooklyn in 1894.

The Brighton Police - References - Netflix