Set in the railway boom of the 1870s, The Way We Live Now captures the turmoil as the old order is swept aside by the brash new forces of business and finance. It contains all the elements that made Trollope the most popular novelist of his day - the trials and tribulations of young love, the enduring values of honourable men; but also the raw energy and excitement of the most powerful city the world had ever seen, and the greed and corruption that lay just below its glittering surface. It is packed with incident - elopement, scandal, suicide, fortunes made and lost, love lost and won.

The Way We Live Now - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 75 minutes

Premier: 2001-11-11

The Way We Live Now - The Way We Were - Netflix

The Way We Were is a 1973 American romantic drama film starring Barbra Streisand and Robert Redford and directed by Sydney Pollack. Arthur Laurents wrote both a novel and screenplay based on his college days at Cornell University and his experiences with the House Un-American Activities Committee. A box office success, the film was nominated for several awards and won the Academy Award for Best Original Dramatic Score and Best Original Song for the theme song, “The Way We Were,” It ranked at number 6 on AFI's 100 Years...100 Passions survey of the top 100 greatest love stories in American cinema. The Way We Were is considered one of the greatest romantic movies ever. The soundtrack album became a gold record and hit the Top 20 on the Billboard 200 while the title song became a million-selling gold single, topping the Billboard Hot 100 respectively, selling more than two million copies. Billboard named “The Way We Were” as the number 1 pop hit of 1974. In 1998, the song was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame and finished at number 8 on the American Film Institute's 100 Years... 100 Songs list of top tunes in American cinema in 2004. It was also included in the list of Songs of the Century, by the Recording Industry Association of America and the National Endowment for the Arts.

The Way We Live Now - Critical response - Netflix

The Way We Were was featured on the Top Ten Films of 1973 by National Board of Review. Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun-Times called the film “essentially just a love story, and not sturdy enough to carry the burden of both radical politics and a bittersweet ending.” He added, “It's easy to forgive the movie a lot because of Streisand. She's fantastic. She's the brightest, quickest female in movies today, inhabiting her characters with a fierce energy and yet able to be touchingly vulnerable . . . The Redford character perhaps in reaction to the inevitable Streisand performance, is passive and without edges. The primary purpose of the character is to provide someone into whose life Streisand can enter and then leave. That's sort of thankless, but Redford handles it well.” Ebert further adds, “Instead, inexplicably, the movie suddenly and implausibly has them fall out of love--and they split up without resolving anything, particularly the plot.” Conversely, TV Guide awarded the film three out of four stars, calling it “an engrossing, if occasionally ludicrous, hit tearjerker” and “a great campy romance.” In her review, Pauline Kael noted that “the decisive change in the characters' lives which the story hinges on takes place suddenly and hardly makes sense.” She was not the only critic to question the gap in the plot; of the scene in the hospital shortly after Katie gives birth and they part indefinitely, Molly Haskell wrote, “She seems to know all about it, but it came as a complete shock to me.” The sloppy editing was exposed in other ways as well; in his review, critic John Simon wrote: “Some things, I suppose, never change, like the necktie Redford wears in two scenes that take place many years apart.” Variety called it “a distended, talky, redundant and moody melodrama” and adds “but Robert Redford has too little to work with in the script,” and “The overemphasis on Streisand makes the film just another one of those Streisand vehicles where no other elements ever get a chance.” Time Out London observed, “[W]ith the script glossing whole areas of confrontation (from the Communist '30s to the McCarthy witch-hunts), it often passes into the haze of a nostalgic fashion parade. Although Streisand's liberated Jewish lady is implausible, and emphasizes the period setting as just so much dressing, Redford's Fitzgerald-type character . . . is an intriguing trailer for his later Great Gatsby. It's a performance that brings more weight to the film than it deserves, often hinting at depths that are finally skated over.”

The Way We Live Now - References - Netflix