Action! Adventure! Alliteration! It's all waiting for you to explore, so pack your bags and wander with Wenda, Wes and Wu as they take you on wild, weird and wonderfully exciting adventures!

Inspired by Margaret Atwood's alliterative children's book series, each one of the 26, eight-and-a-half-minute episodes of "Wandering Wenda" is a whimsical, globe-trotting action adventure with the delights of sound, word and letter exploration and the most fun you can have playing with words! Wenda is a "roll-up-your-sleeves" kind of girl with a heart as huge as a hippo, and a strong sense of adventure. But her overconfidence often, hilariously, gets her and the gang into trouble. No matter where Wenda wanders, she always seems to find herself mixed up in the middle of mayhem! BUT when the going gets tough, she just uses her words... literally! With some quick wordplay she always manages to get out of even the trickiest situations. Along for the adventures are Wesley Woodchuck and a bookish boy named Wu.

Together, the three friends share in the daring exploits of each new travel destination and with a little teamwork (and by playing with words, sounds and letters), there's nothing they can't overcome!

Wandering Wenda - Netflix

Type: Animation

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 15 minutes

Premier: 2017-04-29

Wandering Wenda - Margaret Atwood - Netflix

Margaret Eleanor Atwood (born November 18, 1939) is a Canadian poet, novelist, literary critic, essayist, inventor, teacher and environmental activist. She has published seventeen books of poetry, sixteen novels, ten books of non-fiction, eight collections of short fiction, eight children’s books, and one graphic novel, as well as a number of small press editions in poetry and fiction. Atwood and her writing have won numerous awards and honors including the Man Booker Prize, Arthur C. Clarke Award, Governor General's Award, and the National Book Critics and PEN Center USA Lifetime Achievement Awards. Atwood is also the inventor and developer of the LongPen and associated technologies that facilitate the remote robotic writing of documents. As a novelist and poet, Atwood's works encompass a variety of themes including the power of language, gender and identity, religion and myth, climate change, and “power politics.” Many of her poems are inspired by myths and fairy tales which interested her from a very early age. Among her contributions to Canadian literature, Atwood is a founder of the Griffin Poetry Prize and Writers' Trust of Canada.

Wandering Wenda - Theory of Canadian identity - Netflix

Atwood’s contributions to the theorizing of Canadian identity have garnered attention both in Canada and internationally. Her principal work of literary criticism, Survival: A Thematic Guide to Canadian Literature, is considered somewhat outdated, but remains a standard introduction to Canadian literature in Canadian Studies programs internationally. The continued reprinting of Survival by Anansi Press has been criticized as a view-narrowing disservice to students of Canadian Literature by some critics, including Professor Joseph Pivato. In Survival, Atwood postulates that Canadian literature, and by extension Canadian identity, is characterized by the symbol of survival. This symbol is expressed in the omnipresent use of “victim positions” in Canadian literature. These positions represent a scale of self-consciousness and self-actualization for the victim in the “victor/victim” relationship. The “victor” in these scenarios may be other humans, nature, the wilderness or other external and internal factors which oppress the victim. Atwood’s Survival bears the influence of Northrop Frye’s theory of garrison mentality; Atwood uses Frye’s concept of Canada's desire to wall itself off from outside influence as a critical tool to analyze Canadian literature. According to her theories in works such as Survival and her exploration of similar themes in her fiction, Atwood considers Canadian literature as the expression of Canadian identity. According to this literature, Canadian identity has been defined by a fear of nature, by settler history, and by unquestioned adherence to the community. Atwood's contribution to the theorizing of Canada is not limited to her non-fiction works. Several of her works, including The Journals of Susanna Moodie, Alias Grace, The Blind Assassin and Surfacing, are examples of what postmodern literary theorist Linda Hutcheon calls “Historiographic metafiction”. In such works, Atwood explicitly explores the relation of history and narrative and the processes of creating history. Atwood continued her exploration of the implications of Canadian literary themes for Canadian identity in lectures such as Strange Things: The Malevolent North in Canadian Literature (1995). Among her contributions to Canadian literature, Atwood is a founding trustee of the Griffin Poetry Prize, as well as a founder of the Writers' Trust of Canada, a non-profit literary organization that seeks to encourage Canada's writing community.

Wandering Wenda - References - Netflix