In this sequel to the highly acclaimed 1953 movie, it is revealed that the alien invaders weren't killed by the bacteria: they went into a state of suspended animation. An incident at a nuclear plant exposes them to radiation, which they can survive but which kills the bacteria, restoring them to life. Now they plan a new invasion of Earth, using their ability to merge with human bodies and take control of them. However, they have to continue exposing themselves to radiation to destroy new bacteria as it enters their bodies.

War of the Worlds - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 1988-10-07

War of the Worlds - The War of the Worlds (radio drama) - Netflix

“The War of the Worlds” is an episode of the American radio drama anthology series The Mercury Theatre on the Air. It was performed as a Halloween episode of the series on Sunday, October 30, 1938, and aired over the Columbia Broadcasting System radio network. Directed and narrated by actor and future filmmaker Orson Welles, the episode was an adaptation of H. G. Wells' novel The War of the Worlds (1898). It became famous for allegedly causing mass panic, although the scale of the panic is disputed as the program had relatively few listeners. The program began with the theme music for the Mercury Theater on the Air and an announcement that the evening's show was an adaption of The War of the Worlds. This was followed by a prologue read by Orson Welles which was closely based on the opening of H.G. Wells' novel. The next half hour of the one-hour broadcast was presented as typical evening radio programming being interrupted by a series of news bulletins. The first few updates interrupt a program of dance music and describe a series of odd explosions observed on Mars. This is followed soon thereafter by a seemingly unrelated report of an unusual object falling on a farm in Grover's Mill, New Jersey. Another brief musical interlude is interrupted by a live report from Grover's Mill, where police officials and a crowd of curious onlookers have surround the strange cylindrical object. The situation quickly escalates when Martians emerge from the cylinder and attack using a heat-ray, abruptly cutting off the panicked reporter at the scene. This is followed by a rapid series of increasingly alarming news bulletins detailing a devastating alien invasion taking place across the United States and the world, climaxing with another live report describing giant Martian war machines releasing clouds of poisonous smoke across New York City. After a short break, the program shifts to a more conventional radio drama format and follows a survivor dealing with the aftermath of the invasion and ultimately discovering that the Martians have been defeated not by humans, but by microbes. The illusion of realism was furthered because the Mercury Theatre on the Air was a sustaining show without commercial interruptions, and the first break in the program came almost 30 minutes after the introduction. Popular legend holds that some of the radio audience may have been listening to Edgar Bergen and tuned in to “The War of the Worlds” during a musical interlude, thereby missing the clear introduction that the show was a drama, but research in the 2010s suggests that happened only in rare instances. In the days after the adaptation, widespread outrage was expressed in the media. The program's news-bulletin format was described as deceptive by some newspapers and public figures, leading to an outcry against the perpetrators of the broadcast and calls for regulation by the Federal Communications Commission. The episode secured Welles's fame as a dramatist.

War of the Worlds - Meeting of Welles and Wells - Netflix

H. G. Wells and Orson Welles met for the first and only time in late October 1940, shortly before the second anniversary of the Mercury Theatre broadcast, when they both happened to be lecturing in San Antonio, Texas. On October 28, 1940, the two men visited the studios of KTSA radio for an interview by Charles C. Shaw, who introduced them by characterizing the panic generated by “The War of the Worlds”: “The country at large was frightened almost out of its wits”. H.G. Wells expressed good-natured skepticism about the actual extent of the panic caused by “this sensational Halloween spree. Are you sure there was such a panic in America or wasn't it your Halloween fun?” Orson Welles appreciated the comment: “I think that's the nicest thing that a man from England could say about the men from Mars. Mr. Hitler made a good deal of sport of it, you know.... It's supposed to show the corrupt condition and decadent state of affairs in democracy, that 'The War of the Worlds' went over as well as it did. I think it's very nice of Mr. Wells to say that not only I didn't mean it, but the American people didn't mean it.” When Shaw interjected that there was “some excitement” that he did not wish to belittle, Welles asked him, “What kind of excitement? Mr. H. G. Wells wants to know if the excitement wasn't the same kind of excitement that we extract from a practical joke in which somebody puts a sheet over his head and says 'Boo!' I don't think anybody believes that that individual is a ghost, but we do scream and yell and rush down the hall. And that's just about what happened.” “That's a very excellent description,” Shaw said. “You aren't quite serious in America, yet,” said Wells. “You haven't got the war right under your chins. And the consequence is you can still play with ideas of terror and conflict.... It's a natural thing to do until you're right up against it.” “Until it ceases to be a game,” Welles said, a phrase that Wells repeated. Britain and France had then been at war with Nazi Germany for more than a year.

War of the Worlds - References - Netflix